Black Power

Self-defense is a human right

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Know Your History, Know Your Future

English: Lynching of Laura Nelson, Okemah, Okl...
English: Lynching of Laura Nelson, Okemah, Oklahoma. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This image, although graphic, aptly illustrates the unjust, brutal and hostile environment American Blacks lived in up until the middle of the 20th century.  Mass public lynchings of people of color may no longer exist as a method of punishment in the U.S., however, the intent behind the act serves as a stark reminder for the rationale for bearing arms for self-defense.

Lynching of Laura and L.D. Nelson

As the controversial debate will no doubt rage on for years to come regarding the policy implications of gun control and the right to bear arms, I think it’s important to add another context to the discussion.  My husband and I stumbled across the documentary “No Guns for Negroes” today and I wanted to share it because it provides insight about the history of the discriminatory federal and state gun control policies that’s long been apart of America’s history.



If you have an hour or so to spare, you may also want to watch Bill Duke’s made-for-cable movie about the history of the Deacons for Defense.  Formed in the 1960’s as a self-defense segment of the Black Power movement, Deacons for Defense were law abiding citizens who advocated for the right to defend their property, family and lives with arms (when necessary).


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